Source: defense.gov

There are no other psychiatric diagnoses that impact the emotional, social, behavioral, and academic functioning of a person than the profound negative implications of autism. Autism is very pervasive in ways and less immediately observable as a product. According to Jane Framingham, Ph.D., “Autism exists on a spectrum. People with severe forms of autism may have a difficult time with everyday activities that significantly limit the kinds of things they do as an adult. People with less severe forms of autism may appear to be perfectly normal, except in certain social situations where the impairment becomes more apparent.”

That is why children with autism cases need educational and developmental interventions that are a little bit intensive than those kids experiencing other special needs.

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism spectrum disorder or ASD is a complex developmental condition that involves extensive challenges in social interactions, nonverbal communication and speech, and some forms of repetitive behavior.  “Certain behavioral symptoms,” says Psychologist Emily E. Neuhaus, “such as poor attention and emotional outbursts can confuse parents, teachers, and clinicians alike.”

The first diagnosis of this kind of disorder happens in early childhood. The condition has a lot of overly obvious signs exhibiting around two to three years of age. But not all cases are the same. There are instances that children with autism develop normal functions until preschool age. However, the condition becomes visible when they stop attaining previously learned skills. According to recent data and research, one out of 59 children has autism. ASD is also three to four times more common in boys than in girls. However, girls exhibit fewer signs than boys. Autism is a lifelong condition, but medication and therapy can help lessen its effects.

Source: defense.gov

The Proper Treatment

Finding the correct intervention for autism cases is very difficult. It is important that parents can have an in-depth understanding of their child’s condition. Janeen Herskovitz, LMHC says that this is when parents are usually faced with “myriad feelings, including anxiety, guilt, excessive, hope, and fear about the future.” She adds, “Many parents end up being told that their child does not qualify for an autism diagnosis and are left at a dead-end, with more questions than answers.”

The first step in identifying the appropriate intervention is the assessment of the general intellectual and developmental functioning as well as the presence of a comorbid disorder of the child. The process needs to follow an accomplished employing multidisciplinary method which requires the appropriate guidance of a professional psychiatrist. Since substantial evidence supports that early and proper intervention is strongly linked to a better result, it is essential that professional intervention must take place as soon as possible.

Source: defense.gov

The External Approach

The attending psychiatrist should address the parents of “guardians’ functioning and adjustment” after the diagnosis. There is a big possibility that parents may have prolonged reactions like denial, shock, guilt, anger, grief, and resentment after the diagnosis. These reactions may hinder the parents’ ability to understand the many obstacles that they will face in securing effective ways and services for their child’s overall life. In time, parents will find out that the most sought proven effective programs to control the effects of autism are limited in availability. They might experience some hindering factors such as monetary and geography issues. Nonetheless, it shouldn’t have to be a reason to disregard treatments and medications for the child.

Psychiatry and autism are strongly related to each other. There is no treatment for stopping autism. But through proper psychiatric care, the effects of autism can be minimized.

Children undergo a series of therapy sessions to address their autism disorder. Though the process of gaining back their confidence to function as a proper individual in the community seems a bit hard, it shouldn’t have to be a reason for giving up. Parents should understand that autistic children are still part of the society and they matter.